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The closed commercial state : perpetual peace and commercial society from Rousseau to Fichte / Isaac Nakhimovsky.

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Subject: Geschlossene Handelsstaat (Fichte, Johann Gottlieb)
State, The > History > 18th century.
Commercial policy > History > 18th century.
Social contract > History > 18th century.
Republicanism > History > 18th century.
Political Science.
Genre: Electronic books.
Electronic books.

Record details

  • ISBN: 9781400838752
  • ISBN: 1400838754
  • Physical Description: 1 online resource (x, 203 pages)
  • Publisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, ©2011.

Content descriptions

Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references (pages 177-193) and index.
Formatted Contents Note: 1. Perpetual peace and fichte's theory of the state -- 2. Commerce and the European Commonwealth in 1800 -- 3. Republicanization in theory and practice -- 4. Fichte's political economy of the general will.
Summary: This book presents an important new account of Johann Gottlieb Fichte's Closed Commercial State, a major early nineteenth-century development of Rousseau and Kant's political thought. Isaac Nakhimovsky shows how Fichte reformulated Rousseau's constitutional politics and radicalized the economic implications of Kant's social contract theory with his defense of the right to work. Nakhimovsky argues that Fichte's sequel to Rousseau and Kant's writings on perpetual peace represents a pivotal moment in the intellectual history of the pacification of the West. Fichte claimed that Europe could not transform itself into a peaceful federation of constitutional republics unless economic life could be disentangled from the competitive dynamics of relations between states, and he asserted that this disentanglement required transitioning to a planned and largely self-sufficient national economy, made possible by a radical monetary policy.
Source of Description Note: Print version record.
Summary: This book presents an important new account of Johann Gottlieb Fichte's Closed Commercial State, a major early nineteenth-century development of Rousseau and Kant's political thought. Isaac Nakhimovsky shows how Fichte reformulated Rousseau's constitutional politics and radicalized the economic implications of Kant's social contract theory with his defense of the right to work. Nakhimovsky argues that Fichte's sequel to Rousseau and Kant's writings on perpetual peace represents a pivotal moment in the intellectual history of the pacification of the West. Fichte claimed that Europe could not transform itself into a peaceful federation of constitutional republics unless economic life could be disentangled from the competitive dynamics of relations between states, and he asserted that this disentanglement required transitioning to a planned and largely self-sufficient national economy, made possible by a radical monetary policy.

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