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We are what we mourn : the contemporary English-Canadian elegy / Priscila Uppal.

Uppal, Priscila. (Author).
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Subject: Canadian poetry > 20th century > History and criticism.
Canadian poetry > 21st century > History and criticism.
Elegiac poetry > History and criticism.
Mourning customs in literature.
Grief in literature.
Death in literature.
Elegiac poetry, Canadian (English) > History and criticism.
Canadian poetry (English) > 20th century > History and criticism.
Canadian poetry (English) > 21st century > History and criticism.
Poésie élégiaque canadienne-anglaise > Histoire et critique.
Poésie canadienne-anglaise > 20e siècle > Histoire et critique.
Poésie canadienne-anglaise > 21e siècle > Histoire et critique.
Deuil > Coutumes, dans la littérature.
Chagrin dans la littérature.
Mort dans la littérature.
Genre: Electronic books.

Record details

  • ISBN: 9780773577138
  • ISBN: 0773577130
  • ISBN: 128286758X
  • ISBN: 9781282867581
  • Physical Description: 1 online resource (1 online resource (viii, 312 pages))
  • Publisher: Montréal [Que.] : McGill-Queen's University Press, 2009

Content descriptions

Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references and index.
Formatted Contents Note: Introduction: The work of mourning as reconnection: The contemporary English-Canadian Elegy -- 1. The burned house: Parental elegies and the reconstruction of family after death -- 2. Method for calling up ghosts: Elegies for places and the creation of local, regional, and national identities -- 3. What we save saves us: Elegies for cultural losses and displacements -- Conclusion: We are what we mourn -- Coda: If we are what we mourn, what will we become?
Summary: Why are so many contemporary poets writing elegies? Given a century shaped by two world wars, vast population displacements, and shifting attitudes towards aging and death, is the elegy form adaptable to the changing needs of writers and audiences? In a sceptical age, where can consolation be found?
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