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Leveraging food technology for obesity prevention and reduction efforts : workshop summary / Leslie Pray and Laura Pillsbury, rapporteurs ; Food Forum, Food and Nutrition Board, Institute of Medicine of the National Academies.

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Subject: Obesity > United States > Prevention > Congresses.
Food habits > United States > Congresses.
Food industry and trade > Appropriate technology > United States > Congresses.
Food industry and trade > Technological innovations > United States > Congresses.
Nutrition policy > United States > Congresses.
Food > Composition > Congresses.
Feeding Behavior.
Publication Formats.
Investigative Techniques.
Overnutrition.
Overweight.
Food Industry.
Health Policy.
Habits.
Behavior.
Public Policy.
Industry.
Publication Characteristics.
Americas.
Body Weight.
Nutrition Disorders.
Analytical, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Techniques and Equipment.
Technology, Industry, and Agriculture.
Signs and Symptoms.
Social Control Policies.
Geographic Locations.
Nutritional and Metabolic Diseases.
Behavior and Behavior Mechanisms.
Body Size.
Pathological Conditions, Signs and Symptoms.
Policy.
Psychiatry and Psychology.
Technology, Industry, Agriculture.
Disease.
Body Weights and Measures.
Geographicals.
Social Control, Formal.
Health Care Economics and Organizations.
Body Constitution.
Social Sciences.
Sociology.
Anthropology, Education, Sociology and Social Phenomena.
Physiological Phenomena.
Physical Examination.
Delivery of Health Care.
Phenomena and Processes.
Diagnostic Techniques and Procedures.
Diagnosis.
Nutrition Policy.
Food Analysis.
Obesity.
Congresses.
Food Technology.
North America.
United States.
Genre: Electronic resource.
Electronic books.

Record details

  • ISBN: 9780309212625
  • ISBN: 0309212626
  • ISBN: 128325350X
  • ISBN: 9781283253505
  • Physical Description: 1 online resource (xii, 106 pages) : illustrations
  • Publisher: Washington, D.C. : National Academies Press, ©2011.

Content descriptions

Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references.
Formatted Contents Note: Overview -- Trends in Overweight and Obesity: From the Mid-1970s to the Present -- Changes in Eating Behavior Since the Mid-1970s: Three -- Illustrative Trends -- Identification of Targets for Intervention: Evidence from Behavior -- Studies -- Regulation of Eating Behavior: Theoretical Considerations -- Portion Size, Energy Intake, and Obesity -- Energy Density, Energy Intake, and Obesity -- Food Properties, Satiety, and Energy Intake -- Consumer Decision Making and Energy Intake -- Lessons Learned and Best Practices -- Reducing Calories by Reducing Fat -- Reducing Calories by Reducing Sugar -- Using Portion-Controlled Frozen Meals to Reduce Calorie Intake -- Increasing Fruit and Vegetable Intake -- Increasing Micronutrient Density -- Major Challenges -- Taste -- Affordability -- Product Formulation and Ingredient Costs -- Regulatory Issues -- Consumer Trust -- Potential for Innovation: Next Steps -- Bridge Building with Consumers -- Government-Industry Collaboration -- Innovation: There Is No Magic Bullet -- Need for More Consumer Education on Eating Behavior Norms -- Possibilities for Influencing Consumer Decision Making -- A Primary Prevention Approach -- Need for a More Systematic Analysis of Obesity -- Need for Long-Term Data -- Promotion of "Good" Science by the Food Industry -- Wrap-Up -- References -- APPENDIXES -- Workshop Agenda -- Speaker and Moderator Biographical Sketches -- Abbreviations and Acronyms -- Workshop Attendees.
Summary: "Obesity is a major public health challenge. More than one-third of the U.S. adult population is considered obese, a figure that has more than doubled since the mid-1970s. Among children, obesity rates have more than tripled over the same period. Not only is obesity associated with numerous medical complications, but it incurs significant economic cost. At its simplest, obesity is a result of an energy imbalance, with obese (and overweight) people consuming more energy (calories) than they are expending. During the last 10-20 years, behavioral scientists have made significant progress toward building an evidence base for understanding what drives energy imbalance in overweight and obese individuals. Meanwhile, food scientists have been tapping into this growing evidence base to improve existing technologies and create new technologies that can be applied to alter the food supply in ways that reduce the obesity burden on the American population. Leveraging Food Technology for Obesity Prevention and Reduction Effort examines the complexity of human eating behavior and explores ways in which the food industry can continue to leverage modern food processing technologies to influence energy intake. The report also examines the opportunities and challenges of altering the food supply--both at home and outside the home--and outlines lessons learned, best practices, and next steps."--Publisher's description.
Language Note: English.
Source of Description Note: Print version record.
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24500. ‡aLeveraging food technology for obesity prevention and reduction efforts : ‡bworkshop summary / ‡cLeslie Pray and Laura Pillsbury, rapporteurs ; Food Forum, Food and Nutrition Board, Institute of Medicine of the National Academies.
260 . ‡aWashington, D.C. : ‡bNational Academies Press, ‡c©2011.
300 . ‡a1 online resource (xii, 106 pages) : ‡billustrations
336 . ‡atext ‡btxt ‡2rdacontent
337 . ‡acomputer ‡bc ‡2rdamedia
338 . ‡aonline resource ‡bcr ‡2rdacarrier
520 . ‡a"Obesity is a major public health challenge. More than one-third of the U.S. adult population is considered obese, a figure that has more than doubled since the mid-1970s. Among children, obesity rates have more than tripled over the same period. Not only is obesity associated with numerous medical complications, but it incurs significant economic cost. At its simplest, obesity is a result of an energy imbalance, with obese (and overweight) people consuming more energy (calories) than they are expending. During the last 10-20 years, behavioral scientists have made significant progress toward building an evidence base for understanding what drives energy imbalance in overweight and obese individuals. Meanwhile, food scientists have been tapping into this growing evidence base to improve existing technologies and create new technologies that can be applied to alter the food supply in ways that reduce the obesity burden on the American population. Leveraging Food Technology for Obesity Prevention and Reduction Effort examines the complexity of human eating behavior and explores ways in which the food industry can continue to leverage modern food processing technologies to influence energy intake. The report also examines the opportunities and challenges of altering the food supply--both at home and outside the home--and outlines lessons learned, best practices, and next steps."--Publisher's description.
50500. ‡tOverview -- ‡tTrends in Overweight and Obesity: From the Mid-1970s to the Present -- ‡tChanges in Eating Behavior Since the Mid-1970s: Three -- ‡tIllustrative Trends -- ‡tIdentification of Targets for Intervention: Evidence from Behavior -- ‡tStudies -- ‡tRegulation of Eating Behavior: Theoretical Considerations -- ‡tPortion Size, Energy Intake, and Obesity -- ‡tEnergy Density, Energy Intake, and Obesity -- ‡tFood Properties, Satiety, and Energy Intake -- ‡tConsumer Decision Making and Energy Intake -- ‡tLessons Learned and Best Practices -- ‡tReducing Calories by Reducing Fat -- ‡tReducing Calories by Reducing Sugar -- ‡tUsing Portion-Controlled Frozen Meals to Reduce Calorie Intake -- ‡tIncreasing Fruit and Vegetable Intake -- ‡tIncreasing Micronutrient Density -- ‡tMajor Challenges -- ‡tTaste -- ‡tAffordability -- ‡tProduct Formulation and Ingredient Costs -- ‡tRegulatory Issues -- ‡tConsumer Trust -- ‡tPotential for Innovation: Next Steps -- ‡tBridge Building with Consumers -- ‡tGovernment-Industry Collaboration -- ‡tInnovation: There Is No Magic Bullet -- ‡tNeed for More Consumer Education on Eating Behavior Norms -- ‡tPossibilities for Influencing Consumer Decision Making -- ‡tA Primary Prevention Approach -- ‡tNeed for a More Systematic Analysis of Obesity -- ‡tNeed for Long-Term Data -- ‡tPromotion of "Good" Science by the Food Industry -- ‡tWrap-Up -- ‡tReferences -- ‡tAPPENDIXES -- ‡tWorkshop Agenda -- ‡tSpeaker and Moderator Biographical Sketches -- ‡tAbbreviations and Acronyms -- ‡tWorkshop Attendees.
504 . ‡aIncludes bibliographical references.
5880 . ‡aPrint version record.
546 . ‡aEnglish.
598 . ‡aeBooks on EBSCOhost ‡bEBSCO eBook Subscription Academic Collection - North America
650 0. ‡aObesity ‡zUnited States ‡xPrevention ‡vCongresses.
650 0. ‡aFood habits ‡zUnited States ‡vCongresses.
650 0. ‡aFood industry and trade ‡xAppropriate technology ‡zUnited States ‡vCongresses.
650 0. ‡aFood industry and trade ‡xTechnological innovations ‡zUnited States ‡vCongresses.
650 0. ‡aNutrition policy ‡zUnited States ‡vCongresses.
650 0. ‡aFood ‡xComposition ‡vCongresses.
650 2. ‡aFeeding Behavior.
650 2. ‡aPublication Formats.
650 2. ‡aInvestigative Techniques.
650 2. ‡aOvernutrition.
650 2. ‡aOverweight.
650 2. ‡aFood Industry.
650 2. ‡aHealth Policy.
650 2. ‡aHabits.
650 2. ‡aBehavior.
650 2. ‡aPublic Policy.
650 2. ‡aIndustry.
650 2. ‡aPublication Characteristics.
650 2. ‡aAmericas.
650 2. ‡aBody Weight.
650 2. ‡aNutrition Disorders.
650 2. ‡aAnalytical, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Techniques and Equipment.
650 2. ‡aTechnology, Industry, and Agriculture.
650 2. ‡aSigns and Symptoms.
650 2. ‡aSocial Control Policies.
650 2. ‡aGeographic Locations.
650 2. ‡aNutritional and Metabolic Diseases.
650 2. ‡aBehavior and Behavior Mechanisms.
650 2. ‡aBody Size.
650 2. ‡aPathological Conditions, Signs and Symptoms.
650 2. ‡aPolicy.
650 2. ‡aPsychiatry and Psychology.
650 2. ‡aTechnology, Industry, Agriculture.
650 2. ‡aDisease.
650 2. ‡aBody Weights and Measures.
650 2. ‡aGeographicals.
650 2. ‡aSocial Control, Formal.
650 2. ‡aHealth Care Economics and Organizations.
650 2. ‡aBody Constitution.
650 2. ‡aSocial Sciences.
650 2. ‡aSociology.
650 2. ‡aAnthropology, Education, Sociology and Social Phenomena.
650 2. ‡aPhysiological Phenomena.
650 2. ‡aPhysical Examination.
650 2. ‡aDelivery of Health Care.
650 2. ‡aPhenomena and Processes.
650 2. ‡aDiagnostic Techniques and Procedures.
650 2. ‡aDiagnosis.
650 2. ‡aNutrition Policy.
650 2. ‡aFood Analysis.
650 2. ‡aObesity.
650 2. ‡aCongresses.
650 2. ‡aFood Technology.
651 2. ‡aNorth America.
651 2. ‡aUnited States.
655 4. ‡aElectronic resource.
655 4. ‡aElectronic books.
7001 . ‡aPray, Leslie A.
7001 . ‡aPillsbury, Laura, ‡d1984-
7102 . ‡aInstitute of Medicine (U.S.). ‡bFood Forum.
7102 . ‡aInstitute of Medicine (U.S.). ‡bFood and Nutrition Board.
7112 . ‡aLeveraging Food Technology for Obesity Prevention and Reduction Efforts ‡d(2010 : ‡cWashington, D.C.)
77608. ‡iPrint version: ‡tLeveraging food technology for obesity prevention and reduction efforts. ‡dWashington, D.C. : National Academies Press, ©2011 ‡z9780309212618 ‡w(OCoLC)746028079
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