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Long-term effects of a nutrition education intervention on food security, diet diversity, and nutrition knowledge and practices of women dairy farmers in central Kenya / Natalia Agon.

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Library Call Number Barcode Location Status Due Date
Robertson Library LE3.P8H66 2018 ago 37348007300122 SPEC-ARCH In process -
Subject: Food security > Kenya.
Nutrition > Study and teaching > Kenya.

Record details

  • Physical Description: vi, 54 leaves: illustrations ; 28 cm
  • Publisher: Charlottetown, P.E.I. University of Prince Edward Island, 2018

Content descriptions

General Note: "A thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirement of the Foods & Nutrition Honours Program in the Department of Applied Human Sciences" -- t.p.
Dissertation Note: Honours thesis. B.Sc.. University of Prince Edward Island, 2018.
Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references (leaves 42-49).
Abstract: "This project evaluated the long-term effects of a nutrition education provided to Kenyan dairy farm women. Objectives were to compare and describe the difference in food security, diet diversity and nutrition knowledge and practices of a sample of women who received the nutrition education and a random sample of women who did not. A quasi-experimental 'post-test' only design was used to assess food security, diet diversity and nutrition knowledge and practices. One-on-one in-home interviews were conducted with women in the intervention (n=20) and comparison (n=19) groups. Information on demographics, food security, diet diversity and KP was collected using questionnaires and a 24-hour diet recall. Food security information was gathered using the Household Food Insecurity Access Scale, diet diversity was assessed using a 24-hour recall and nutrition knowledge and practices information was gathered using the questionnaire from the original nutrition education implementation evaluation research. The severity of food insecurity was similar between both groups. The majority of women in the intervention (55%) and comparison (42%) were moderately food insecure. More comparison group women (52%) experienced insufficient quantity of food although this difference was not statistically significant. Positive knowledge impacts from the nutrition education intervention were evident. A trend towards higher consumption of dark leafy green vegetables and other vitamin A vegetable and fruits was observed in the intervention group. Furthermore, women in the intervention group were aware of the reasons why soaking maize and beans is important (70%). Lastly, more intervention women used whole grain maize for ugali (100%). This research provides some evidence of the long-term sustainability of nutrition education regarding nutrition knowledge." -- p. ii.
LDR 00620cam a2200205 a 4500
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003CONS
00520190703180227.0
008070101s2018 pica abm 000 0 eng
040 . ‡aCaPCU ‡beng ‡erda
10010. ‡aAgon, Natalia. ‡eauthor.
245 . ‡aLong-term effects of a nutrition education intervention on food security, diet diversity, and nutrition knowledge and practices of women dairy farmers in central Kenya / ‡cNatalia Agon.
264 1. ‡aCharlottetown, P.E.I. ‡bUniversity of Prince Edward Island, ‡c2018
300 . ‡avi, 54 leaves: ‡billustrations ; ‡c28 cm
336 . ‡atext ‡btxt ‡2rdacontent
337 . ‡aunmediated ‡an ‡ardamedia
338 . ‡avolume ‡anc ‡ardacarrier
500 . ‡a"A thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirement of the Foods & Nutrition Honours Program in the Department of Applied Human Sciences" -- t.p.
502 . ‡aHonours thesis. ‡bB.Sc.. ‡cUniversity of Prince Edward Island, ‡d2018.
504 . ‡aIncludes bibliographical references (leaves 42-49).
5203 . ‡a"This project evaluated the long-term effects of a nutrition education provided to Kenyan dairy farm women. Objectives were to compare and describe the difference in food security, diet diversity and nutrition knowledge and practices of a sample of women who received the nutrition education and a random sample of women who did not. A quasi-experimental 'post-test' only design was used to assess food security, diet diversity and nutrition knowledge and practices. One-on-one in-home interviews were conducted with women in the intervention (n=20) and comparison (n=19) groups. Information on demographics, food security, diet diversity and KP was collected using questionnaires and a 24-hour diet recall. Food security information was gathered using the Household Food Insecurity Access Scale, diet diversity was assessed using a 24-hour recall and nutrition knowledge and practices information was gathered using the questionnaire from the original nutrition education implementation evaluation research. The severity of food insecurity was similar between both groups. The majority of women in the intervention (55%) and comparison (42%) were moderately food insecure. More comparison group women (52%) experienced insufficient quantity of food although this difference was not statistically significant. Positive knowledge impacts from the nutrition education intervention were evident. A trend towards higher consumption of dark leafy green vegetables and other vitamin A vegetable and fruits was observed in the intervention group. Furthermore, women in the intervention group were aware of the reasons why soaking maize and beans is important (70%). Lastly, more intervention women used whole grain maize for ugali (100%). This research provides some evidence of the long-term sustainability of nutrition education regarding nutrition knowledge." -- p. ii.
650 0. ‡aFood security ‡zKenya.
650 0. ‡aNutrition ‡xStudy and teaching ‡zKenya.
71020. ‡aUniversity of Prince Edward Island, ‡edegree granting institution.
71020. ‡aUniversity of Prince Edward Island. ‡bDepartment of Applied Human Sciences.
901 . ‡aUPEI-805042 ‡b ‡c1757644 ‡tbiblio ‡sSystem Local

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