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◄ Search Results Showing Item 70 of 1996

Writing philosophy : a guide for Canadian students / Lewis Vaughn & Jillian Scott McIntosh.

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  • 1 of 1 copy available at Island Libraries.

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0 current holds with 1 total copy.

Library Call Number Barcode Location Status Due Date
Robertson Library B52.7.V38 2009 37348007173594 STACKS Available -
Subject: Philosophy > Authorship.

Record details

  • ISBN: 9780195430547
  • ISBN: 0195430549
  • Physical Description: xii, 177 p. ; 21 cm.
  • Edition: 1st Canadian ed.
  • Publisher: Don Mills, Ont. : OUP Canada, 2009.

Content descriptions

Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references and index.
Formatted Contents Note: Part 1: Reading and Writing -- Chapter 1. How to Read Philosophy -- Asking the Big Question -- A Different Kind of Reader -- Rule 1-1 Approach the Text with an Open Mind -- Rule 1-2 Read Actively and Critically -- Rule 1-3 Identify the Conclusion First, Then the Premises -- Rule 1-4 Outline, Paraphrase, or Summarize the Argument -- Rule 1-5 Evaluate the Argument and Formulate a Tentative Judgment -- Writing a Paraphrase or Summary -- Chapter 2. How to Read an Argument -- Premises and Conclusions -- Judging Arguments -- Rule 2-1 Know the Basics of Deductive and Inductive Arguments -- Rule 2-2 Determine Whether the Conclusion Follows from the Premises -- Rule 2-3 Determine Whether the Premises Are True -- Chapter 3. Rules of Style and Content for Philosophical Writing -- Rule 3-1 Write to Your Audience -- Rule 3-2 Avoid Pretentiousness -- Rule 3-3 Keep the Authority of Philosopher in Perspective -- Rule 3-4 Do Not Overstate Premises or Conclusions -- Rule 3-5 Treat Opponents and Opposing Views Fairly -- Rule 3-6 Write Clearly -- Rule 3-7 Avoid Inappropriate Emotional Appeals -- Rule 3-8 Be Careful What You Assume -- Rule 3-9 Write in First Person --- Rule 3-10 Avoid Discriminatory Language -- Chapter 4. Defending a Thesis in an Argumentative Essay -- Basic Essay Structure -- Introduction -- Argument Supporting Thesis -- Assessment of Objections -- Conclusion -- A Well-Built Essay -- Writing the Essay: Step by Step -- Step 1. Select a Topic and Narrow It to a Specific Issue -- Step 2. Research the Issue -- Step 3. Write a Thesis Statement -- Step 4. Create an Outline of the Whole Essay -- Step 5. Write a First Draft -- Step 6. Study and Revise Your First Draft -- Step 7. Produce a Final Draft -- Chapter 5. Avoiding Fallacious Reasoning -- Straw Man -- Appeal to the Person -- Appeal to Popularity -- Appeal to Tradition -- Genetic Fallacy -- Equivocation -- Appeal to Ignorance -- False Dilemma -- Begging the Question -- Hasty Generalization -- Slippery Slope -- Composition -- Division -- Chapter 6. Using, Quoting, and Citing Sources -- Rule 6-1 Know When and How to Quote Sources -- Rule 6-2 Do Not Plagiarize -- Rule 6-3 Cite Your Source Carefully -- Rule 6-4 Build a Bibliography if Needed -- Part 2: Reference Guide -- Chapter 7. Writing Effective Sentences -- Rule 7-1 Make the Subject and Verb Agree in Number and Person -- Rule 7-2 Express Parallel ideas in Parallel Form -- Rule 7-3 Write in Complete Sentences, Not Fragments -- Rule 7-4 Connect Independent Clauses Properly -- Rule 7-5 Delete the Deadwood -- Rule 7-6 Put Modifiers in Their Place -- Rule 7-7 Be Consistent in Tense, Voice, Number, and Person -- Rule 7-8 Communicate Pronoun References Clearly -- Chapter 8. Choosing the Right Words -- Rule8-1 Select Nouns and Verbs Precisely -- Rule 8-2 Prefer the Active Voice -- Rule 8-3 Use Specific Terms -- Rule 8-4 Avoid Redundancy -- Rule 8-5 Be Aware of the Connotations of Words -- Rule 8-6 Learn to Distinguish Words That Writers Frequently Mix Up -- Rule 8-7 Strive for Freshness; Avoid Cliches -- Rule 8-8 Do Not Mix Metaphors -- Rule 8-9 Beware of Awkward Repetition.
◄ Search Results Showing Item 70 of 1996

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