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Family matters : a socio-historical study of fictive kinship metaphors in 1 Thessalonians / Trevor J. Burke.

Burke, Trevor J. (Author).
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Electronic resources

Subject: Bible. Thessalonians, 1st > Social scientific criticism.
Bible. Thessalonians, 1st > Language, style.
Bible. New Testament. Thessaloniciens, 1re > Critique sociale.
Bible. New Testament. Thessaloniciens, 1re > Langue.
Kinship in the Bible.
Metaphor in the Bible.
Kinship > History.
Parenté dans la Bible.
Métaphore dans la Bible.
Parenté > Histoire.
Genre: Electronic books.

Record details

  • ISBN: 9780567516688
  • ISBN: 0567516687
  • Physical Description: 1 online resource (xiii, 287 pages).
  • Publisher: London ; T & T Clark International, ©2003.

Content descriptions

Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references (pages 257-273 and indexes.
Formatted Contents Note: Chapter 8 [filadelfia] FAMILY HONOUR AND THE IMPORTANCE OFEARNING YOUR OWN ''BREAD'' (1 THESSALONIANS 4.9-12)Chapter 9 ORDER IN THE AFFAIRS OF THE BROTHERHOOD (1 THESSALONIANS 5.12-15); Conclusions; Bibliography; Index of References; Index of Authors.
Cover; Editorial Board; Title; Copyright; CONTENTS; Abbreviations; Acknowledgments; Part I ISSUES AND APPROACHES; Chapter 1 BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT; Part II PRIMARY SOURCE EVIDENCE; Chapter 2 PARENTS AND CHILDREN IN THE ANCIENT WORLD: JEWISH EVIDENCE; Chapter 3 PARENTS AND CHILDREN IN THE ANCIENT WORLD: NON-JEWISH EVIDENCE; Chapter 4 BROTHERLY RELATIONS IN THE ANCIENT WORLD; Part III PAUL AND THE THESSALONIANS; Chapter 5 THE APOSTLE PAUL AS PARENT; Chapter 6 PAUL AND THE THESSALONIAN BROTHERHOOD; Chapter 7 BROTHERHOOD, MORALITY AND OUTSIDERS (1 THESSALONIANS 4.3-8).
Summary: PaulGÇÖs first letter to the Thessalonians boasts a preponderance of fictive kinship terms (e.g. father, children, nursing mother, brother etc). In this book, Burke shows that Paul is drawing on the normal social expectations of family members in antiquity to regulate the affairs of the community. Family metaphors would have resonated immediately with PaulGÇÖs readers and the author surveys a broad range of ancient texts to identify stock meanings of the father-child and brother-brother relations. These stereotypical attitudes are explored to understand PaulGÇÖs paternal relations (2:10-12) wi.
Source of Description Note: Print version record.

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